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LCHF and Running – Update

4 Jul

I realise I haven’t written again in a while. Life is so busy – I have been falling behind on a few things but I am trying to be more organised! I have had a lot of people asking about my Low Carb High Fat Lifestyle and how I am finding it as a runner – so I thought I would post an update as today’s post.

It has been almost 12 weeks since I embarked on the unthinkable – running on less than 25g of carbs a day! The reason why I started came about from doing a lot of reading about low carb high fat diets, and generally feeling sluggish and unwell from having a lot of carbohydrate. I wrote a little bit about that in a previous post.

It hasn’t been 100% easy

12 weeks in and I am not going to say it has been 100% easy especially being a sociable person but I am almost 7kg lighter and have run one race whilst transitioning which was a challenge! But on the whole I feel much better and I don’t find it a huge issue – I don’t feel like I have a ‘brain fog’ anymore I actually feel more awake and alert!

It took a while to feel comfortable eating lots of fats i.e. butter, coconut oil, cream, bacon etc where normally I would watch my intake of all of these things – my friend who is a PT was fairly sceptical but even she said just the other day she was amazed at the results. I have had a few hiccups when I have been out and realised that there is nothing I can eat or have been to friends for dinner and didn’t want to appear rude so ate what was in front of me – but I jumped straight back on the wagon the next day and it has all been fine. I have found now the best way to handle the eating is to take my own food and that works a lot better, and I take a packed lunch to work – so all good – although the day they all ordered pizza and cake was tricky but I sat with my salad and LCHF bread whilst everyone munched pizza around me!

Under Armour Speedform Gemini 2 shoe

The LCHF lifestyle has meant I have lost weight which is an added bonus

Difference in running 

The biggest issue with my running I have found is that I am generally at the moment a bit slower than I was and am running probably about 1 minute slower per km than I used to – but from an endurance point of view generally I feel great as long as I run at my slower pace. From reading a lot and hearing about other people’s experiences this is fairly normal. The trick now is to move over from burning glucose to burning fat and then in theory things should improve.

The MAF Method

At the same time I am also experimenting with the MAF method which was created by Phil Maffetone whose theory helps from an exercise point of view to train at the appropriate intensity to develop your fat burning aerobic system, improve health and perform better. My banting (LCHF) coach has encouraged me to do this to help with switching my body over but I am not doing it all the time so not sure whether it will work – it means taking your age off 180 and then that is the maximum heart rate you can run at. I found it very difficult and looked ridiculous running as slowly as I was but apparently it works. So we shall see on that one.

On the whole I feel great and am very glad I have switched to this lifestyle so far but I still have a fair way to go with my running as it takes time to get the speed back – but with two 10k races coming up next month we’ll see whether I have improved or not!

If you are intrigued by a LCHF lifestyle don’t just listen to me as I am certainly not a qualified nutritionist or doctor so always consult a professional if embarking on something new – but have a read of a few books and articles as it is always good to read for yourself.

In a previous post I posted some books that had turned my thinking around – I have listed them again below – they are not affiliate links – I just want to help point interested people in the right direction!

Further reading

Gary Taubes – Why We Get fat 

Tim Noakes – Real Meal Revolution

David Perlmutter – Grain Brain

William Davis – Wheat Belly 

 

Treadmill Vs Running Outside

22 Jun

I have finally bitten the bullet today and rejoined a gym! I really thought I could get through winter and not have to do it but I had a bit of an experience a week or two ago that made me rethink. I was running around the lake near where I live at 6am and a guy appeared in front of me. It kind of threw me a bit. He laughed and said some words in a language I didn’t understand, and I just kept on running.

It made me think. What if he hadn’t been as passive? and what if he had been with other guys? I got home a little bit shaken and took stock of it all, and decided that I wouldn’t run outside in the dark alone again. Need some tips on safety – read one of my previous posts all about it.

My issue is that during the week I have no-one to run with as my friends are dotted all over the place – weekends are not a drama, but weekdays are an issue. So I joined a gym! I’m quite excited to be going back for a while – it will be nice to be in the warm:-)

Before I committed to join my gym I sat and really thought about the benefits of both the treadmill and running outside to weigh up whether I would use the gym. I decided in the end that I would likely use both – gym during the week and outside on the weekend. My notes that I wrote for myself are below for anyone wondering what the benefits of both are.

treadmills

Benefits of running on the treadmill and running outside

Running on the treadmill

Great for speed sessions

Treadmills are really good for when you have specific training requirements – i..e if you are running a speed session and need to do x km per hour. You can literally program the treadmill for whatever speed you need to run at, and away you go which is very handy when working to a specific program with specific speed training requirements.

All weather training 

The treadmill is a great alternative when the weather isn’t going in your favour. Whether it is torrential rain outside or a heatwave – it really doesn’t matter if you are running on a treadmill inside.

Great for the solo runner 

If the only time that you can train is early in the morning or last thing at night, and it is dark – running on a treadmill is a great way to ensure that you don’t put yourself at risk by running alone in the dark. You can run at any time of the day on the treadmill without having to be conscious of where you run and keeping safe.

Better when you have an injury

The treadmill can be better if you have an injury than running outside, as you will have a consistent flat surface to run on, whereas outside the surface on which you are running may not be as even, the pavement may be harder which could worsen your injury. Although on the flip side it is good to ensure that your sessions on the treadmill are mixed up to ensure you don’t fall prey to injury from just pounding away on the treadmill session after session.

 

Running Outside 

Change of scenery and route 

Running on the treadmill can be very boring, seeing the same view time after time and not physically getting anywhere. Running outside is great therefore for alleviating boredom and mixing things up with your running routes, enabling you to change your routes, add hills and variation to your terrain i.e. roads, trails.

Save money 

The biggest advantage of running outside compared to inside on a treadmill is that unless you own your own treadmill it means that you save money on hefty gym membership fees. You can literally put on your running gear, step outside the door and go!

More realistic training conditions for a race 

The treadmill can often seem easier than running outside, and if you are training for something in particular it can often be better to run outside to get used to the conditions that you will be running in rather than running on a treadmill where it isn’t always an accurate reflection of true racing conditions.

 

 

Sometimes there are more important things than running!

24 May

I haven’t written for a while as life outside of running for me has been a bit crazy. We’ve been flying around as a family trying to fit lots of things into our life, and as a result my son got a cold and I was feeling under the weather last week and at the weekend, and I also started a new job so getting used to not working completely for myself and just the general routine has been challenging – but so far so good!.

As a result of all of the above I missed a few runs which initially I was really beating myself up about – but it was something my friend Sam said to me when I cancelled that made me think – she said:

Screen Shot 2016-03-22 at 11.57.56 am

Running for fun! Sam and I finishing the Twilight Half Marathon earlier this year:-)

“We’re just doing it for fun anyway, no stress!”

Exactly right.

I’m not a professional runner, I do this for fun and I think the moment it starts to feel like it’s a burden will be the moment I stop doing it. So I reframed how I was thinking and thought ok – no worries it’s ok to have a week off, and I am good to go next week.

I think sometimes it is so easy to get caught up into things and to accept that we cannot always do everything – and sometimes things have to go – and for me on this occasion – it was running.

I’m back now – feeling better and ready to run tomorrow. I also entered the City to South – just to give myself a challenge. It will be very slow but I’m doing it with my friend and it will be FUN:-) Then after that it’s the Dubbo Stampede which will again be FUN (and hilly) running around the Dubbo Zoo – so a few things to look forward to running wise.

It’s a short post today but lots more posts to come.

Have a great week of running and having fun!

Zoe xoxo

Product Review: Under Armour Speedform Gemini 2 shoe @ UnderArmourAust

10 May

I have been a bit slack on my blog posts in the last week or two. Life has been busy and got in the way I’m afraid! I’ve been doing some running and pushing on with trail running as well as starting my LCHF eating plan – more on that soon.

Anyway a little while ago Running Heroes sent me some shoes from Under Armour for me to test and write about. You’ll see my review below.

Before I go any further please note that I was not paid to write this article and my opinions are real and all my own – just in case you were wondering! 

Under Armour Speedform Gemini 2 Shoe

So when my parcel arrived from Running Heroes – naturally I was very excited as I love new running gear, and when I opened the box I was not disappointed where colour was concerned – the shoes I was sent were a lovely turquoise blue with a pink inner lining – perfect for me.

Under Armour Speedform Gemini 2 shoe

Colour and Aesthetics

The shoe does come in 12 different colours but I quite like the one I was sent as some of the other colours are either way out there or too bland for me. It is quite a light shoe in weight compared to my usual Kayanos and the top back of the shoe where I have been used to it being really sturdy feels quite soft and lightweight which was an initial concern to me needing stability.

There is plenty of padding at the bottom on the sole of the shoe which is a good thing for me as a lot of shoes I see now are very flat looking and I know I wouldn’t get on with them having had issues with very lightweight shoes.

Under Armour Speedform Gemini 2 shoe

Testing it out

Under Armour Speedform Gemini 2 shoe

Just about to go for a session in my shoes

I tried running in the Gemini 2 a number of times and did different types of runs on different types of terrains to test them out including a speed session, a short session, on the road and across fields/grass.

The shoes felt light and comfortable, and whilst I’m not used to lighter shoes they felt stable to run in. When running in them it definitely felt like there was added support which I quite like and I also felt quite nimble on my feet so they worked well in my speed session.

One thing to note is that the shoe has an embedded sockliner which means you can’t remove the insole. For me that was an issue  because I wear orthotics so with this shoe I can’t wear them when wearing the shoe – so I probably wouldn’t wear these on a longer run or should have asked for a larger size so I could fit them in with more room. It’s not a deal breaker but if you wear orthotics make note of this comment to potentially go up a size.

Conclusions

I felt very light on my feet and like I was quite bouncy and I have enjoyed running in the shoes.

Pros

> Great selection of colours

> Nice light shoe but with support and comfortable to run in

> If you are a techno person then there is a Record Equipped version which comes with a chip embedded in the shoe and will give you all sorts of metrics in relation to your run.

> The price is quite reasonable at $225

Cons

> For me the main issue is not being able to wear my orthotics in these shoes – however had I ordered a larger size that wouldn’t have been an issue – so if you wear orthotics consider this when buying them.

Mother’s Day Gifts for Mums that Run!

28 Apr

I was thinking about Mother’s Day the other day and am not really expecting much in the way of gifts on Mother’s Day as my husband and I tend to buy things as we see them, but I have a feeling my bub may have bought me something with Daddy’s help this year….

Anyway I have compiled a few ideas if there is anyone reading this needing a few ideas for their wife/mum that is a runner. Some of these things I have and love or would like to get at some point. None of these by the way are affiliate links – just some ideas for cost effective presents:-)

Sogz Gym Towels $39 – special on their Facebook page for $34

sogz gym towels Great idea for a mum that goes to the gym or yoga. I was sent one of these beautiful towels to try and I use it at home all the time when doing my arms and abs, and also in the car after I have been out running so the car seat doesn’t get all yucky. They have some great colours and the price is good.

Visit http://www.sogz.com.au

Allure Style $50+ – 20% off for Mother’s Day on their Instagram page 

Allure Style

Allure Style

I found this lady at the Fig Tree Pocket Market and she basically does personalised handstamped jewellery, and I have been after some sort of handstamped necklace that I could put a running quote or wording such as 42, 21km, 10km, 5km etc on and wear round my neck, and she can do most things – so I am adding this in as this is on my list. The quality looks great and the price is good. According to her Instagram page you can get 20% off for Mother’s Day:-) So if my husband is reading…..Hint! Hint!

Visit https://www.etsy.com/au/shop/allurestyle

Inspiring Running Books 

Inspiring running books

If you or your mum are an avid reader and like to be inspired then these four books are all amazing and would make a great Mother’s day present.

The Greatest by Jim Denison

Running with the Kenyans by Adharanand Finn

Pole to Pole by Pat Farmer

50 Marathons 50 Days by Dean Karnazes

All of these books are really inspiring reads. I had to put my hero Haile Gebreselassie’s book in – it’s a fairly old book but amazing to read about how the Ethiopians train, and Dean Karnazes is a true running inspiration of mine so his 50 marathons in 50 days had to go in too!

I’ve linked to Amazon but Fishpond and many others have the books too.  These are not affiliate links).

My last idea for Mother’s Day is something I need (hint hint husband if you are reading!)

Deep Tissue Massage or a Relaxing Massage

massage

I get so stiff from running that a massage would be the perfect Mother’s Day gift! Whether it is a brutal deep tissue massage or a nice relaxing one a massage would make a lovely gift for mums out there:-)

Running for a cause – The Mother’s Day Classic

26 Apr

There are so many fun runs across Australia and the world now days, and as a result it has become a great way for charities to use them as ways to fundraise. The Women in Super Mother’s Day Classic (MDC) is one of those – in aid of breast cancer research.

I’ve run the MDC a few times but won’t be able to run this year. I was however approached by them to help them raise awareness of the event which has so far raised $27.4m for research into Breast Cancer, and my post today is sharing the testimony of the event’s co-founder Louise Davidson.

I am very fortunate to have not had anyone close to me suffer with breast cancer. It’s a terrible disease so very important we keep supporting charities that are researching a cure. You can enter the MDC by going to their website, alternatively if you are unable to attend then why not donate anyway!

Louise’s Story 

> Louise co-founded the event in 1998 when she lost her mother to breast cancer – as she wanted to make Mother’s Day meaningful. She founded the event with with fellow superannuation executive, the late Mavis Robertson.

> She was awarded Victoria’s Australian of the Year Local hero Award in recognition of founding the event.

> The event is this year in 100-plus locations across Australia, and has grown to involve more than 130,000 Australians. Last year was Louise’s 18th year at the MDC but her first as a breast cancer survivor.

Louise found the 2015 Mother’s Day Classic, her first since her own diagnosis with breast cancer, incredibly moving.

Louise Davidson and Mavis Robertson - co-founders of the Mother's Day Classic

Louise Davidson and Mavis Robertson – co-founders of the Mother’s Day Classic

“I wasn’t sure how I’d react. I’ve participated every other year as an organiser, and as a daughter who lost her mum to the disease, and each year draws out feelings of sadness for my own loss and empathy for others’ loss… but last year it was more emotional.

“My diagnosis gave me a different perspective, it was much more personal,” according to the 47-year-old CEO of the Australian Council of Superannuation Investors.

1 in 8 Australian women are affected by breast cancer 

While some may see a sense of irony that she should face the disease Mother’s Day Classic fights against, there’s no reason her long-term and close involvement with the event would make her immune to a disease that affects one in 8 Australian women.

She confesses to being surprised at just how shocked she was at her diagnosis: “even knowing the statistics, co-founding Mother’s Day Classic and having Mum with the disease, I really didn’t expect to get breast cancer”.

A mother’s influence

Louise Davidson’s motivation for starting the event was seeing firsthand the impact of breast cancer – Louise was very close to her mum, Kaye, and was her primary carer through her two-year battle with breast cancer before Kaye died at age 52.

In the 20 years since Kaye’s death, Louise has found Mother’s Day Classic a positive way to spend what had been a sad day without her Mum.

Just two months after the 2014 event, Louise became one of the (on average) 40 Australian women who are diagnosed with breast cancer each day.

“Because of Mum, I’ve always had regular checkups. As always I looked at the mammogram film before my appointment – not that I really know what I’m looking at. There was a blurry spot that really stood out to me, and worried me.

“The doctor noticed the blurry spot too and sent me for a biopsy. A few days later he rang at 7.30 at night and said you’re not going to like the news, you’ve got breast cancer.”

“At the better end of breast cancer”

Louise was quickly booked for surgery for a small lump that doctors described as being caught early and “at the better end of breast cancer”. She had an anxious wait for pathology which dictates how aggressive the cancer is and whether there is any spread. On a scale of 1-3 grades, with three being the most serious, hers was a grade 2.

“Having been involved in MDC for almost two decades, and having been carer for my Mum when she went through her treatment, it was interesting to see what the reality of being a breast cancer patient was like,” she says.

“While so much progress has been made, you still see things that could be done better (for me I would like to see patients not have to be permanently tattooed for radiation treatment).

“Mum was diagnosed at 50, I’m 47 now. There’s never been anything selfish about my involvement with Mother’s Day Classic but it turns out now that my involvement has been beneficial to me – like every other patient or every woman who could be diagnosed in the future, it’s research that we rely on to make sure we get better outcomes,” Louise says.

The reason for research

She had a lumpectomy and sentinel node biopsy. NBCF-supported research found that sentinel lymph node biopsy is just as effective as traditional and more invasive surgery in predicting and controlling the spread of breast cancer. (Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy (SLNB) was introduced as an option for some women as part of breast surgery. The sentinel node is the first lymph node to which breast cancer cells are likely to spread. If the sentinel node is cancer free, there is no need to remove further lymph nodes – reducing the risk of debilitating lymphoedema.)

She is happy to have dodged the need for chemotherapy, requiring six weeks of radiotherapy.

She takes the drug Tamoxifen, a necessity for 5-10 years to decrease her risk of recurrence. (Tamoxifen is used to prevent and treat breast cancers that test positive for estrogen receptors. It lowers the chance that breast cancer will grow, by blocking the effects estrogen has on cancer cells).

Again this highlights the importance of funding research – there are currently trials underway to see if survivors get better results by taking Tamoxifen for 5 or 10 years.

“Research has made a significant difference to outcomes for women diagnosed with breast cancer.  Earlier diagnosis, much more precise imaging and surgery and big leaps forward in the drug treatments available have all contributed,” Louise says.

Living in “the new normal”

The familiarity of constantly being around breast cancer via Mother’s Day Classic didn’t make the process any easier when she faced her own diagnosis- in fact, Louise feels it made things “much scarier”.

“I understand that Mum’s cancer was a lot more advanced, so the prognosis was not good. She developed secondary cancers and died, which to me makes it very real that this might not be the end of it for me,” Louise says.

“Although since being diagnosed, lots of people in my circle have shared their stories of having had breast cancer when they were younger – and I’d had no idea. So it is positive that all these years later they are alive.”

The hardest part of the process was telling her three daughters – Kaye (named after her Mum), 15, and twins Lily and Rosie, 13.

“I have been the daughter hearing the diagnosis and dealing with my fears for my Mum. It was tough to see my own daughters in that same position.

“My girls never met my Mum but through Mother’s Day Classic they know her story. I’ve emphasized to the girls that my cancer was caught early, and that it’s very different to my Mum’s case. But it’s hard knowing the worry this causes.”

The experience has changed Louise’s perspective on life.

“I don’t know if this change will be permanent, but for now I definitely have a different outlook.  There’s a heightened sense that I shouldn’t put off anything that I want to do, things can change so quickly. There’s a very strong sense of ensuring I spend more time with the people I love – and spending more time with my girls during treatment was something I really valued.

“I’m definitely conscious that my response to my breast cancer has made me think more deeply about Mum’s experience and in a way I’ve gone through a whole new grieving process for Mum.

“I have more understanding of how she must have been feeling. She was single, and even though I cared for her, it must’ve been tough to have no partner to give her a hug and be there for her – there’s always the sense of a parent trying to shield a child from the full brunt of anything painful. I have a renewed empathy for her.”

Making Mother’s Day meaningful

Co-founders Mavis Robertson and Louise, having never participated in a fun run, organised the first Mother’s Day Classic in 1998 with a few thousand superannuation colleagues in Sydney and Melbourne.

“I’d had the experience with my mother and we knew a lot of other women who were being diagnosed. At that time breast cancer wasn’t receiving its fair share of the funding pie, so through women in super we set up some volunteer committees in Melbourne and Sydney,” Louise says.

One of the most satisfying things for Louise has been witnessing the event become a positive outlet for those fighting breast cancer, and for those who have lost loved ones, giving a real purpose to what could be a sad day (Mother’s Day without your Mum).

In 2010, inspired by those she had met at the event over many years, Louise ran her first Mother’s Day Classic. Being out on the course instead of in the “control centre” gave her new insights into how important the event was to those battling breast cancer.

“It is a celebration of the lives of those who have breast cancer and others we’ve lost to the disease. It’s emotional but not depressing. There is solidarity in seeing so many people wearing placards on their backs to remember or support someone with breast cancer,” she says.

“Personally, it has been a really powerful way for me to use the strong grief I had for the loss of my mother. For participants, our sadness has been channeled into a fantastic outcome.

“It continues to grow because it is much more than just a fundraising event.  I’ve heard of instances where people attend the Classic and are prompted to go to a breast examination the next day. They discover a lump, go to their doctor and detect breast cancer earlier than they would have if they had not been prompted by the event. So if we save one life that way, it makes everything we have done worthwhile.”

“My three girls weren’t even born when we started the event. They have grown up with the Mother’s Day Classic as the only Mother’s Day they know. When they were really little they used to write me Mother’s Day cards that said “happy Mother’s Day Classic”.”

“I hope that fundraising through events like the Mother’s Day Classic will mean my girls don’t have to worry about breast cancer when they get older.”

There’s progress, but at what pace?

Like most patients, Louise found going to the hospital daily and being a patient a very draining experience.

“People around you, whether they are family, friends or work colleagues, want you to be able to assure them that the cancer has gone – and you just don’t get that sort of all clear with breast cancer. Psychologically, it’s always there and always will be,” she says.

With successful research over the past few decades has come increased survival rates – and learning how to successfully navigate survival (and the thought always at the back of one’s mind: will the cancer come back?).

Louise Davidson and her three daughters

Louise Davidson and her three daughters

Louise is investigating whether any of the known breast cancer genes are involved in her case – information that could be vital for her three girls when they reach adulthood. This knowledge can also impact on different treatment paths. Her genetic material would be stored, and as new genes are discovered checked against her material.

Like all with the disease, her hope is that by the time her girls are adults breast cancer will not exist.

She knows that while research has made many advances, it doesn’t pay to be complacent.

“In 1993 I went with Mum to see her breast surgeon and Mum asked him about the risks for me of getting breast cancer. He said ‘by the time Louise reaches an age where this could affect her, breast cancer might not exist, or if it does the diagnostic and treatment advances may mean it’s no longer such a major issue’.

“So unfortunately, we have not moved as fast as we might have hoped or imagined…,” Louise says.

To register or for more information go to http://www.mothersdayclassic.com.au

Ways you can help:

Put together a teamhttp://www.mothersdayclassic.com.au/teams/about-teams/become-a-team-captain/

Fundraisehttp://www.mothersdayclassic.com.au/fundraise/about-fundraising/

Volunteerhttp://www.mothersdayclassic.com.au/volunteer/volunteer-now/volunteer-roles/

Start a local event http://www.mothersdayclassic.com.au/event-info/start-your-own-mdc-event/

For tips on running for charity have a look at a blog post I wrote for RunStopShop last year on where to start.

 

Product Review: SKINS Dnamic shorts @SKINSAU

11 Apr

A month or so ago I was contacted by SKINS Australia to see whether I would like to try a pair of their new Dnamic Compression Shorts. I had a look at the range, and already being a compression pant lover – jumped at the chance. Below is my opinion of them. If you read right to the bottom you can also read my disclaimer. I wasn’t paid for this review.

Skins Dnamic women's 1/2 tights

Skins Dnamic women’s 1/2 tights

Look and Feel

I must admit when I first saw the Dnamic range I was a bit nervous as some of the product range designs were pretty funky and out there – awesome if you like big patterns but I tend to wear dark colours on my legs. I was very thankful therefore when my shorts arrived – as the SKINS team had sent me the most conservative of designs:-).

When I took the shorts out of the packaging I sucked in my breath wondering how on earth I’d get my butt into the shorts! I was a bit worried that perhaps I had ordered the wrong size – but after some wriggling around and squirming – I was comfortably into my shorts! One thing was for certain – there would be no falling out of these or over the top – everything felt really snug and nicely compressed😀

As a runner that is not a stick insect I like the fact with these shorts that they are high waisted compared to a lot of shorts on the market. Often I have worn shorts and half way into my run everything has started wobbling, or I end up pulling them up because they are low risers or not tight enough on the waist – and the good old muffin top starts forming!

Compression

SKINS say that they have a unique sizing system, and as long as you have the right sizing you will get the right compression needed. Their system claims to reduce lactic acid build up for more power and less recovery time.

Like I said I found the shorts very comfortable. It is tricky when wearing shorts rather than long tights to give an exact sense of feeling with regards to compression but I did find I didn’t ache too much after my runs I ran in them – my calfs still twinged a bit – but they weren’t covered!

I also found that the shorts fabric didn’t feel like it would wear out any time soon. Being a person whose thighs rub together I am always paranoid that shorts won’t last long, and I do have a couple of pairs that have frayed and won’t be replaced. But these shorts seem pretty resilient which is a plus for me.

I did keep the shorts on for a while a couple of times after training to see how they improved the aches in my legs (if there were any) – but I didn’t try sleeping in them which a lot of people do! On the whole I found during and after runs in them that I felt good, and my legs felt fairly strong compared to when running in my normal non compression shorts in training runs.

Skins Dnamic

Post run at Kangaroo Point showing off my SKINS

Pros

  • Very comfortable when on – make sure you stick to the sizing guidelines when ordering otherwise they will be very very tight or too loose and not efficient from a compression point of view
  • Nice fit and not low rise – a definite plus for me having an hourglass shaped figure
  • Great range of designs in the range – if you like patterns there are plenty and if you are more conservative like me they have catered for those also.
  • UV protection – 50+ – excellent for when running in a warm sunny climate

Cons

Not really any major cons on this product. I have always loved SKINS and don’t really have anything bad to say about these shorts – although the cost might be an issue to some people at $95 a pair – but you do get what you pay for so they are ultimately an investment to help you in your running.

 

Product Review disclaimer

Please note I am not paid for writing product reviews and if there are links to the product I am reviewing in my post I am not paid for that either. If a post is a paid post or an affiliate post I will highlight at the top of the post. My views are my own and I try to be as balanced as I can. 

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